Sol HaroonSol Haroon (sol@suniva.com
#SolarMOOC Lecture: DC Microgrid Systems – December 20, 2012

Sol has 20 years of experience in electronics engineering design, system architecture and leading teams. Currently, he is engaged as a lead systems engineer at Suniva addressing client needs around the world both grid-tie and off-grid PV applications. Prior to that, he was a systems team lead at ADVA Optical responsible for architecting microchips for high speed data networking. Sol has over 10 years of experience in sustainable energy including direct personal experience with net-zero housing design (passive techniques, solar thermal, and solar photovoltaics) and electric vehicle design. He has also currently partnered with Oakridge National Labs and Southface Energy Institute for a special nation-wide program to retrofit houses for energy efficiency with the aim of 30% energy reduction. He has been published in trade journals such as PV Magazine, featured on NREL’s on-line webinars, and interviewed on the radio in Atlanta on sustainable living.

“Direct Current (DC) is making a comeback. Appliances today that do not involve compressors or motors are often semiconductor-based which natively run DC.  This includes modern-day solid state lighting (LED) that are increasingly lighting up more buildings. A microgrid is an independent system that supplies power for a specific entity such as a residence, building, or commercial infrastructure. Specifically, a DC microgrid has the ability to store power; the key to a microgrid is that it represents a decentralized form of power that naturally can be fed by renewable energy sources such as Photovoltaics. In short, enable distributed power sources to feed power loads that are a natural fit. According to the Electric Power Research Group, electronic data centers powered by DC microgrids are 20% more efficient than the best AC systems, and up to 30% more efficient than most AC systems. A well designed DC microgrid system can coexist with a standard AC system powering the devices that require the appropriate current type where it makes sense economically and for efficiency” – Sol Haroon

Watch his lecture here:
DC Microgrid Systems

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